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I have a strange observation...

I have noticed that people who die young have a sort of heaviness in their eyes, like they are carrying a lot of stuff around. On the other hand people who die old have light eyes. Of course, there are exceptions, few though. I have used this to estimate how many time I have left, and it's possible I may die in middle age, as I'm kind of in the middle where it comes to heavy eyes. Has anyone noticed this?

Comments

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    No.
    Personally, I haven't seen enough people in death to be able to comment either way.
    However, I did see both my Grandfather and my father dying.
    Neither had 'light eyes', as you describe.
  • I don't mean dead or dying. While alive, I can see it.
  • I suppose you must of asked yourself if
    the heaviness or lightness that you see in there eyes is really a reflection of how you see their circumstances.
    Kundoseeker242Yishai
  • dhammacittadhammacitta Explorer
    edited September 2013
    Hmm, I don't think so. I've read somewhere that an angry, violent life leads to an early death. Therefore preservation of life and kindness possibly lead to longevity. Possibly. This is all speculation. But I think that heaviness is anger and bad deeds, and that lightness is peace of mind, kindness and good deeds. See for yourselves. Really observe.

  • @dhammacitta
    Since your question was about the heaviness of the eyes in those dying young as opposed to a lightness in the eyes of the elderly and you equate that with bad deeds & good deeds?.....
    Why would you see the young or old, filled with more of one than the other?
  • Well, naturally there are many so-called nice people that died very young. And many so-called bad people who lived to ripe old age. What I'm saying is, the ones who die young, may be nice, do many good deeds and have generally good karma. But the heaviness in their eyes indicate an impediment to long life. For reasons uncertain, that person can't live for too long. Not in this particular life.
  • KundoKundo Sydney, Australia Veteran

    Hmm, I don't think so. I've read somewhere that an angry, violent life leads to an early death. Therefore preservation of life and kindness possibly lead to longevity. Possibly. This is all speculation. But I think that heaviness is anger and bad deeds, and that lightness is peace of mind, kindness and good deeds. See for yourselves. Really observe.

    Yeah I gotta go with speculation on this. If I send you a pic of my face can you tell by the amount of heaviness in my eyes how long I have left on earth? I really have to get my debts cleared....
    MaryAnnehowvinlyn
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran
    Thank you Dhammachick. Very incisive comment.
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited September 2013

    I don't mean dead or dying. While alive, I can see it.

    You could make a fortune in life insurance assessment. Sadly I do not see that happening . . . (from your 'cyber aura').
    :crazy:
    MaryAnneFairyFellerKundoTosh
  • Sassiness when I'm being serious. How nice... :orange:
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran
    Somehow I can't help but remember my grandmother saying, "Your mother is not well. She won't live out her 40s." And then a few years later, "Your mother is not well. She won't live out her 50s." And then, "Your mother is not well. She won't live out her 60s." My mother lived to be 84.

    Once again, you have asked us what we think. And you are rejecting everything we express.
  • What are you expressing? Answer: Rudeness. I am sick and tired of this. What world is this when not even a Buddhist forum can be welcoming?
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran
    Disagreeing with you is not rudeness. And there's nothing unwelcoming about it.

    The general consensus here seems to be that we don't believe you can "sense" early death in people.
  • dhammacittadhammacitta Explorer
    edited September 2013
    Here is disagreeing: I don't believe in you. That doesn't seem right. Why do you think you have that ability?
    Here is rudeness: Oh my God, read me then! That's amazing. Lol...
    Please disagree, let's discuss it like civilized people, like adults interested in debates. But don't come with sarcasm on serious matters and expect me to laugh along.
    You may not see it as rudeness as you aren't it's target. It is unwelcoming and insensitive. Would the Buddha act like you do? Time to rethink your actions when you are unnecessarily hurting people. Yes, I'm getting hurt. Maybe I'm too sensitive, but then again your words shouldn't harm even the most sensitive of people.
    Take this into account:

    "[1] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial (or: not connected with the goal), unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

    [2] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

    [3] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing & disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.

    [4] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.

    [5] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.

    [6] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, and endearing & agreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them. Why is that? Because the Tathagata has sympathy for living beings."
    (Abhaya Sutta)
  • DavidDavid some guy Veteran
    I haven't noticed it. My wife passed on at 36 and she had beautiful, shining eyes right up to the end.
    YishaiTosh
  • Sorry about that, mate. I guess it's all a matter of perspective. You can see many things in someone's eyes. I don't know her but through your description I guess she was happy and in love. Bless!
  • I was watching a documentary about George Harrison yesterday and it struck me that he had a look of an old man even in his youth, as if his soul was old. And he died young(ish) at 58.
    If you believe in reincarnation then it is accepted that the soul chooses its life on Earth to learn specific things, so knowledge of the length of life could be part of that. And some people make extraordinarily accurate predictions about their lives. According to her sister's memoir, cellist Jacqueline du Pre predicted her own incapacity from MS while still a young child. Perhaps this knowledge can be communicated via the eyes to those sensitive enough to see it.
  • dhammacittadhammacitta Explorer
    edited September 2013
    Are you kardecist, @poptart?
    Also, I agree with what you said about George Harrison. He had a lot of 'content', so to speak. I definitely see a medium heaviness which makes sense since he lived long, but not as long as to be an old man.
  • @dhammachick
    Sorry to hear that.
    Well, I did say that, but notice I didn't make an absolute statement. I've read that it could be it, or I don't know what it could be. As I said before I was just speculating, trying to spark some sort of interesting debate.
    Congenial... I found them to be sassy, in the bad way. But let's agree to disagree.
    I don't know what you mean by saying that I should've said: "I believe that some people can sense an early death".
    I don't think I've made sweeping statements, here is when my uncertainness about this have shown:
    "Of course, there are exceptions, few though."
    "it's possible I may die in middle age"
    " I've read somewhere that an angry, violent life leads to an early death. Therefore preservation of life and kindness possibly lead to longevity. Possibly. This is all speculation."
    I also said that heavy, I think it is anger. Not necessarily, and not necessarily do they indicate a short life. I've seen someone with heavy eyes who lived 'till 80 years old or something.
    In short, I've been nothing but careful, trying to avoid grasping at my own ideas too much. I think I did well. :-/
  • Are you kardecist, @poptart?
    Also, I agree with what you said about George Harrison. He had a lot of 'content', so to speak. I definitely see a medium heaviness which makes sense since he lived long, but not as long as to be an old man.

    I had to go and Google kardecist, since I hadn't heard the term before. For anyone else who hasn't heard of it, here is a definition.

    I wouldn't say I'm a believer in spirits or reincarnation but I do find the subject fascinating. We should be open to all possibilities, and since many people give witness to the existence of spirits and reincarnation their accounts deserve our consideration.

    Even with all our scientific discovery there is much about the nature of mind that is still undiscovered. To quote Shakespeare, "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
  • @poptart I admire your open-mindedness.
    poptart
  • Like most people my age I have known personally many people who have died. Old and young.
    From old age, cancer or other disease, overdose, auto accidents, industrial accidents, drowning, murder, ect.
    Although I have not paid much attention to their eyes in particular, there has been no noticeable lightness or heaviness to their eyes, or any other physical feature by which I could have predicted their death at any age. Except the way addicts look which can include heavy eyes. Even then I couldn't say how long they could live.
    Some people think that someone's eyes can be a good indicator of the state of their health, but unhealthy people can live for a surprisingly long time.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanpaku
    So, no I have not noticed this.
    vinlynKundo
  • Hmm, sanpaku. I've hear of that. But I believe that is too uncertain.
  • I see a lot of old people who come at the world with hatred, heavy hearts, and heavy eyes. Unhumbled and soured by old age.

    My grandma passed away a few years ago. As she approached death, her skin paled, her eyes remained open for longer, and then they stopped opening. I do not remember ever thinking them light or heavy. She said to my mom before her final stroke: "Don't you ever feel like just running with the wind? I want to run and feel the wind."

    I do not feel like a lightness or heaviness correlates to age of death. I do feel like the eyes can tell you a lot about a person though. I have heavy, sleepy eyes, and I am a sleepy person. My friend has wide eyes and dark circles... he stays up late at night and writes and always has thoughts racing through his mind. Another friend has kind and inviting eyes, narrow but bright. My significant other has bright, wondering, but worried eyes.
    dhammacittaKundo
  • I just wanna apologize for anyone that got offended because of what I said. It's really just speculation. Lesson here is be more careful with my words. Sorry. Especially to @dhammachick
    Tosh
  • KundoKundo Sydney, Australia Veteran
    @dhammacitta - thank you.
  • BeejBeej Human Being Veteran
    hindsight is discoloring your lens. but here's the good news: buddhism has no use for hindsight, so feel free to discard it whenever you like.

    i've had several friends die young. and guess what? i became the one with the "heavy" eyes. and i'm still here. am i an exception? nope. just a human being.
    MaryAnneriverflow
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