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Sugar level high in blood - any suggestions, please?

misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a HinduIndia Veteran
edited December 2014 in Diet & Habits

Hi All,

Few days back i got a small wound on the thumb of my leg. I thought it would recover by itself after I use some basic medical ointment. But it did not recovered. Just 2 to 3 days ago, I thought to take it to a doctor to get it checked. Then on seeing the wound, the doctor suggested i should go for blood test to check my sugar level. Next day morning before breakfast I went for blood test and the reading came as 102 with normal range of 70-110. Then the doctor advised to go for blood test again after 2 hours of having breakfast and the reading came as 150 with normal range of 90-160. So the sugar level was found to be high in my body and I think I just got checked before actually having diabetes disease. Then my family has started my food restrictions of mainly to have no sugar in my diet like tea without sugar ( it tasted awful when i first drank it, but after 3 to 4 cups, it is ok - i used to drink nearly 5 to 6 cups of tea daily, but now even without sugar still i am drinking tea nearly 5 times in a day - may be it is my addiction to tea), no rice, no potato, no deserts and no sweets :'( - i love to eat sweet things and damn no sweets for me now.

I did some google search on diet recommendation for a diabetic person. i came to know there are 2 kinds of diabetes - type 1 in which no insulin is made in body and type 2 in which insulin is made but it is not sufficient. so i am assuming if i become a diabetic patient, i shall most probably be a type 2 diabetic patient. I am 33 years old currently.

Just wanted to know from you all if you know something what type of food can control diabetes, any particular food item which can control the sugar level in the blood etc. Any information shall be helpful to me. So please suggest. Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited December 2014

    Well, recommended diet depends in part on what type of diet a given nationality is accustomed to having, traditionally, historically. Ayurvedic doctors in India recommend complex carbohydrates, like lentils and brown rice with vegetables. Tibetan Ayurvedic doctors recommend a low-carbohydrate diet with higher protein, as Tibetans have been herders for thousands of years, and do best on a meat diet. Westerners do very well bringing down blood-sugar on a high-protein, low-carb diet. Some Native American tribes get ill on a high-protein diet, whereas their traditional corn, beans and squash diet balances their blood sugar. The buffallo-hunting tribes need meat to balance their blood sugar.

    Did your doctor not give you any recommendations? You should call him back and ask. But the basics will apply to anyone: avoid processed flour (white flour), potatoes (they're like eating sugar!), and white rice. Avoid sugary fruits (bananas, pineapple) and all fruit juice. Eat smaller amounts of fruit than usual (1/2 apple, instead of a whole one). Dairy is ok: yoghurt, milk in your tea (yummy!), cheese.

    Do check with your doctor. And exercise is essential. Perhaps a brisk morning walk before work, then an exercise routine after work. At least get some free weights, and work with those. Walk, run, swim or ride a bike daily.

    OP, a friend of mine who's an artist, suddenly found herself going blind very quickly. Terrifying! She went to the doctor, and was told her blood sugar was in the diabetic range. She had to get it under control, because art was her livelihood. She got a stair-stepper machine or an eliptical walking machine, or something like that, and used it twice/day for 20 minutes. Her eyesight came back in no time, and when she got retested a couple of weeks later, the nurse said she'd never seen anyone bring their sugar levels down so quickly! Exercise is key.

    lobstermisecmisc1personmmo
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    Hi

    You're quite young for having developed diabetes and I'm really sorry to hear that.
    It's been about 6 or 7 years ago when I first discovered I had it. I was on diabetic medication for a short while, but I no longer take medication because I keep my blood sugar reasonable on diet alone.

    One of the main tricks I stumbled on was the fact that mega-doses of Vitamin C (plus lots of water) will bring your blood sugar down. I continue to take lots of it (also aspirin, but you have to be more careful with that). I buy different brands of vitamin C to see which ones are easier for me to take, as well as effectiveness. I buy the kind that are 1,000 mg per capsule. In the beginning, I used to take anywhere from 6,000 mg to 12,000 mg per day. Also, make sure you take magnesium, vitamin D3 and CoQ10. You have to do your own research about this stuff, but this is what I do.

    Gentle exercise, such as walking and some simple exercises of your choice can also help you keep your blood sugar at a healthy level.

    mmo
  • stavros388stavros388 Explorer
    edited December 2014

    First of all, you need to work with the doctor to determine if you are T1 or T2... two very different animals. I was 36 when I was diagnosed. Naturally, it was assumed I was type 2 because of my age... until I didn't respond whatsoever to drugs. I have what is called late onset T1 diabetes. Are you overweight? Does diabetes run in your family? Could be T2. Or are you losing weight even though you eat lots? Probably T1. If you are T1, you will need insulin. I started on multiple daily injections, but am now on a pump (which I highly recommend). You will need to check your blood glucose levels regularly and find a diabetic educator so you know how much to eat, how to count carbs, how much insulin to take, and so on. You will not be able to correct your disease with diet much, unfortunately.

    I do not know much about T2, though (only that it is much different). I think you can control your condition more with diet if you are T2, though. Regardless of whether or not you are T1 or T2, you need to speak with medical professionals face to face as you cannot get what you need from any internet forum, Buddhist or otherwise! ;)

    Best of luck. And if it is discovered that you have type 1 diabetes, feel free to pm me for support or info.

    silvermisecmisc1
  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran

    Well, some more information from my side. My parents do not have diabetes. I am a type of skinny person, means even though i eat properly, but still i do not put much fat on my body, but in last few months i started to develop a small tummy, which has eventually reduced due to change in my work location and now i need to walk some distance to get a local train or keep standing in the local train, when all the seats are full etc. 2 to 3 months back my weight was around 57 kg and when nearly 2 weeks back I checked my weight, I found it was 60 kg - it was a slight surprise for me, as my eating patterns were slightly disturbed as I moved to a new work location and needed to set up the rented accomodation, so I was thinking the weight might have gone down to 55 kg, but to my surprise it reached 60 kg. I am 5 feet 8 inch tall. So my weight is less as per my body, but it has been the same skinny condition since my childhood.

    I think my blood sugar level even if it is on higher side, still it is in normal range, so I think I have not got diabetes disease till now - or - have I already got diabetes disease? any suggestion, please. thanks in advance.

  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @Dakini: Thanks for the diet advice above.

    Does white flour of wheat is also likely to increase the blood sugar level as I eat daily chapattis made of white flour of wheat? Please suggest. Thanks in advance.

  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran

    I think I will have to wait for doing some type of exercise, because the wound in the thumb of my leg is at the bottom base side, and it has been operated 2 to 3 days ago, with some stiches done on it finally. so while walking also, it slightly hurts. so till it is not fully recovered, i think i will not be able to do any exercise like fast walking.

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    Hi again @misecmisc1. I was unclear what you meant by thumb of my leg, so I didn't know where (still don't) is. But you are seeing a doctor, right?

    Any starch is likely to increase blood sugar. Eat more fresh vegetables and lean meats and some fresh fruits, but not too much fruit because of the sugar content.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    I think he means his big toe....

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @federica said:
    I think he means his big toe....

    >

    Oh-kay - now I know! :)

  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @silver said:
    Hi again misecmisc1. I was unclear what you meant by thumb of my leg, so I didn't know where (still don't) is. But you are seeing a doctor, right?

    my big toe has a wound at the bottom side and stitches were done by the doctor. today i went for change of bandage and the doctor said it will take another 4 days to cut the stitches.

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    @misecmisc1 said:
    my big toe has a wound at the bottom side and stitches were done by the doctor. today i went for change of bandage and the doctor said it will take another 4 days to cut the stitches.

    >

    Good luck with that!

    misecmisc1
  • personperson Where is my mind? 'Merica! Veteran

    While being on the high side you are still in normal range so no need to get too worried. @Dakini gave some good dietary guidelines on how to control blood sugar levels so making efforts to adopt some of those might help ease your fears, don't worry if you can't do everything since you aren't actually diabetic.

    misecmisc1
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem Samsara Loop Veteran

    @misecmisc1:
    Green tea is fabulous for diabetes.
    Good results have been tested especially on type 2 (type 1 is very difficult to treat).
    Find an organic blend and drink at least four a day.
    Obviously, without sugar.

    Use brown rice (I love brown basmati rice) and brown flour instead of white.

    Get acquainted with the Glycemic Index diet.
    Two type 2-diabetes friends swear by the GI diet:
    http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/understanding-carbohydrates/glycemic-index-and-diabetes.html

    misecmisc1
  • I just converted your blood sugar of 150 mg/dl to 8.3 mmol/L, which is the system we use in Canada. Yeah, 8.3 isn't bad at all. I should have considered that before I explained T1 diabetes to you. You may be prediabetic and just need to keep an eye on things for a while, but I wouldn't get too worried just yet. If my levels were 8.3 after eating a meal, I'd be very happy. ;)

    misecmisc1
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @misecmisc1-- It's only natural to ask around, but if at all possible, request a diabetes specialist doctor. The only other strong advice I would give, is that you do thorough research about diabetes and make decisions and opinions based on your own experiences, intuition and the best of that research. Doctors opinions come last with me -- The more I ignored their advice and went on my own research and experiences, the better my outcomes were.

    After all, it's just YOUR life! (*)

  • ChazChaz The Remarkable Chaz Anywhere, Everywhere & Nowhere Veteran

    @misecmisc1 said:
    Hi All,

    Few days back i got a small wound on the thumb of my leg. I thought it would recover by itself after I use some basic medical ointment. But it did not recovered. Just 2 to 3 days ago, I thought to take it to a doctor to get it checked. Then on seeing the wound, the doctor suggested i should go for blood test to check my sugar level. Next day morning before breakfast I went for blood test and the reading came as 102 with normal range of 70-110. Then the doctor advised to go for blood test again after 2 hours of having breakfast and the reading came as 150 with normal range of 90-160. So the sugar level was found to be high in my body and I think I just got checked before actually having diabetes disease. Then my family has started my food restrictions of mainly to have no sugar in my diet like tea without sugar ( it tasted awful when i first drank it, but after 3 to 4 cups, it is ok - i used to drink nearly 5 to 6 cups of tea daily, but now even without sugar still i am drinking tea nearly 5 times in a day - may be it is my addiction to tea), no rice, no potato, no deserts and no sweets :'( - i love to eat sweet things and damn no sweets for me now.

    I did some google search on diet recommendation for a diabetic person. i came to know there are 2 kinds of diabetes - type 1 in which no insulin is made in body and type 2 in which insulin is made but it is not sufficient. so i am assuming if i become a diabetic patient, i shall most probably be a type 2 diabetic patient. I am 33 years old currently.

    Just wanted to know from you all if you know something what type of food can control diabetes, any particular food item which can control the sugar level in the blood etc. Any information shall be helpful to me. So please suggest. Thanks in advance.

    My suggestion is to talk to your doctor. Listen to what he/sher says recommends and prescribes. Follow the instructions, to the letter. DO NOT listen to anyone or anything else.

    Your physical wellbeing depends on it.

    misecmisc1stavros388
  • HamsakaHamsaka goosewhisperer Polishing the 'just so' Veteran

    Well, I'm a nurse and so far I don't see any life threatening advice here :)

    What you've described in diet changes (no sugar, less rice, bread, noodles and more vegetables and meat) will have your blood sugar regulated well. It will be great to see what your sugars are the next time you visit your doctor.

    Many, many people, even skinny people, have diabetes.

    When it is first discovered, and you change your diet appropriately, it might never get worse than it is now. People manage diabetes with diet changes only, if their sugars are only on the high end of normal. You should be fine. Type 2 diabetes is very common and yours seems mild. You can keep it that way by managing your diet, educating yourself, and regular check ups with the doctor.

    misecmisc1
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem Samsara Loop Veteran

    @misecmisc1 said:
    Does white flour of wheat is also likely to increase the blood sugar level as I eat daily chapattis made of white flour of wheat?

    You can always try wholemeal or whole-wheat chapatis...

    http://allrecipes.co.uk/recipe/4884/wholemeal-chapati.aspx
    http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/whole-wheat-chapatis
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/chapatis

    misecmisc1
  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @misecmisc1 said:
    Dakini: Thanks for the diet advice above.

    Does white flour of wheat is also likely to increase the blood sugar level as I eat daily chapattis made of white flour of wheat? Please suggest. Thanks in advance.

    Yes, OP. I was thinking of your chapattis when I wrote that. They can be made from whole wheat flour, though, if you can find a grocery that sells that. Also, there are Indian herbs that help control blood sugar. hm.... gymnema? That's from India. Cinnamon. Those are two that should be easily available to you. If you have a vitamin store anywhere in your area, you should be able to find something that combines minerals and herbs to control blood sugar. Chromium and biotin help. I don't know where you live, but if there's a Tibetan community in the area, you could look for a Tibetan herbal doctor. They have very effective herbs for reducing blood sugar levels.

    You don't have diabetes yet, as you're still in the normal range. But it's important to watch your levels, and to arrest this trend of increasing levels.

    misecmisc1silver
  • rohitrohit Maharrashtra Veteran
    edited December 2014

    Eat bitter melon, bitter gourd,
    Regularly but in limited quantity
    It is very helpful..

    Onions, garlic also important...

    In addition regular practice of yoga like Sarvangasan

    misecmisc1
  • pegembarapegembara Veteran
    edited December 2014

    Just wanted to know from you all if you know something what type of food can control diabetes, any particular food item which can control the sugar level in the blood etc. Any information shall be helpful to me. So please suggest. Thanks in advance.

    A number of clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bitter melon in the treatment of diabetes.

    In January 2011, the results of a four-week clinical trial were published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, which showed that a 2,000 mg daily dose of bitter melon significantly reduced blood glucose levels among patients with type 2 diabetes, although the hypoglycemic effect was less than a 1,000 mg/day dose of metformin. [68]

    Other older studies have also suggested an association between bitter melon intake and improved glycemic control, while a report published in the March 2008 issue of Chemistry and Biology found that bitter melon increased cellular uptake of glucose and improved glucose tolerance. [69]

    However, research published in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology in 2007 failed to show any benefits of bitter melon for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, while another clinical review published two years later in the British Journal of Nutrition stated that more, better-designed and clinical trials are required to confirm the fruit’s role in diabetes treatment.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/natural-therapies/bitter-melon.html

    http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2012-10/nutrient-profile-bitter-melon-momordica-charantia

    Dakinimisecmisc1
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran
    edited December 2014

    type 2 diabetes is entirely controllable and even reversable with diet/lifestyle. Don't trade sugar for sugar replacements. Your body can respond the same way to them because as soon as your mouth detects sweetness, your body starts to respond.

    Look up online Glycemic Index foods list, and stick to the lower ones. There are a large variety of them. your doctor should be assigning you a nutritionist to help you figure out a diet, but I don't know if that sort of support exists where you live.

    Our son is a type 1 diabetic and has been for 4 years. We have much training at this point on proper diet for dealing with diabetes (though his is not reversible) and the one thing you will find is, as with everything, not everything that works for others will work for you. I have a diabetic friend who gets sugar spikes from eating hot dogs...which have no sugar or carbs at all. So you never know how your body's unique chemistry will work.

    If you can find it, I highly recommend the book "Think Like a Pancreas" by Gary Scheiner. It is technically for people who are using insulin, but there is a boat load of information about diet and exercise and how all those thing impact your blood sugar. There will be a lot to figure out, and it will be overwhelming at times. It will come. But get used to daily exercise, drinking mostly water, and mostly removing (or greatly reducing) anything high glycemic from your diet. White potatoes, white pasta, white rice, sugar, candy, pop, juice, pastries, bagels, anything highly processed and quite possibly things you can't imagine just yet. Even condiments have carbs in them, like ketchup and BBQ sauce.

    If you have any questions, feel free to let me know. We have to deal with it differently than you will to start, because our son is insulin dependent. But we've learned a lot about diet, exercise, and how the body processes things and responds to environment, and how it affects the blood sugar. If you take the right steps now, you can quite possibly reverse it or halt it at least.

    Also, I totally agree with the recommendation above to find an endocrinologist, a doctor that specializes in the treatment of diabetes (and other things affecting the same systems). They will be leagues ahead of current research and information compared to most general or family doctors. They will be able to give you very specific diet information, tips for when and how to check your blood sugar, and how to notice and track patterns in yourself. They do offer various medications for those with type 2 (you are unlikely to have type 1 at this point in your life, and usually in type 1 you will see a much higher blood sugar...when our son was diagnosed his blood sugar was 512, and even though he is doing well now, his blood sugar can swing from 40 to 500+ depending). Anyhow, considering you are barely above the range of normal you will probably be quite successful at managing with lifestyle.

    misecmisc1
  • RhodianRhodian Veteran
    edited December 2014
    As for tea if you drink tea in bags get lose tea I do not even want sugar in it.

    Now my mom has diabetes she starts the day with yogurt and cereal and some figs in it. Make sure cereal is without many fats sugars and such you want fibers. After that she eats bread with low fat cheese 20+ or stuff with not so much sugar and she makes a salad with cucumber tomatoe etc. After that it's dinner with potatoes cooked mostly veggies and in her case 100 gram of meat. She uses this to lose weight but also for diabetes the idea is to keep fiber uptake.

    Good luck.

    Note some say potatoes are bad but you have to see how it reacts to your body you can try stuff depending on how bad/good you are doing after all I do not know how severe it is.
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    Regular white potatoes are generally high glycemic but there is a difference if you are eating a small potato with the skin on, as opposed to a big pile of mashed potatoes, for example. And for sure, everything affects people differently. Sweet potatoes/yams are not high glycemic (as long as you don't put syrup or brown sugar on them).

    silvermisecmisc1
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    Fwiw, healthy fats like salmon and other fish is important for everybody. Even butter. My mom and grandma grew up being led falsely to believe that margarine (which has the deadly trans-fats) was better for them than butter. Just thinking about how they fed themselves this poison thinking it was good, is kinda devastating.

    Do your research, everybody.

  • WanMinWanMin Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @misecmisc1 said:
    Hi All,

    Few days back i got a small wound on the thumb of my leg. I thought it would recover by itself after I use some basic medical ointment. But it did not recovered. Just 2 to 3 days ago, I thought to take it to a doctor to get it checked. Then on seeing the wound, the doctor suggested i should go for blood test to check my sugar level. Next day morning before breakfast I went for blood test and the reading came as 102 with normal range of 70-110. Then the doctor advised to go for blood test again after 2 hours of having breakfast and the reading came as 150 with normal range of 90-160. So the sugar level was found to be high in my body and I think I just got checked before actually having diabetes disease. Then my family has started my food restrictions of mainly to have no sugar in my diet like tea without sugar ( it tasted awful when i first drank it, but after 3 to 4 cups, it is ok - i used to drink nearly 5 to 6 cups of tea daily, but now even without sugar still i am drinking tea nearly 5 times in a day - may be it is my addiction to tea), no rice, no potato, no deserts and no sweets :'( - i love to eat sweet things and damn no sweets for me now.

    I did some google search on diet recommendation for a diabetic person. i came to know there are 2 kinds of diabetes - type 1 in which no insulin is made in body and type 2 in which insulin is made but it is not sufficient. so i am assuming if i become a diabetic patient, i shall most probably be a type 2 diabetic patient. I am 33 years old currently.

    Just wanted to know from you all if you know something what type of food can control diabetes, any particular food item which can control the sugar level in the blood etc. Any information shall be helpful to me. So please suggest. Thanks in advance.

    I'm still to figure out how you are considered diabetic with your sugar levels within normal range. As far as I know type 1 diabetes results from a lesion in the pancreas while type 2 which is the one you are afraid of getting results from the cells in your body becoming insensible to insulin. As far as I know the way to prevent type 2 diabetes is to avoid a high calorie diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Cutting sugar looks like a step in the right direction.

    misecmisc1
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    @WanMin said:I'm still to figure out how you are considered diabetic with your sugar levels within normal range.

    >

    I've googled blood sugar charts and they can vary quite a bit. Here's one really basic chart:

    I am diabetic now (reasonably controlled with diet and stress mgmt, for about 7 yrs, but when I was pregnant and they did a liquid blood sugar test, I was hypoglycemic...the doctor showed me the chart after my test, and the blood sugar level barely even moved!

    WanMin
  • So, it's been a few days since you started your thread, OP. Have you begun an exercise regime, yet, if only walking? It will make a difference. Blood sugar levels decline after a walk or gym workout. This has been documented by diabetes clinics and specialists. It's one of the basic recommendations.

    misecmisc1WanMin
  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran

    @Dakini said:
    So, it's been a few days since you started your thread, OP. Have you begun an exercise regime, yet, if only walking? It will make a difference. Blood sugar levels decline after a walk or gym workout. This has been documented by diabetes clinics and specialists. It's one of the basic recommendations.

    Sorry Dakini, but I have not started on any exercise currently and neither walking. Actually, the wound in my thumb of my leg is currently healing after having 3 stitches done by doctor at it. So even though I wish to do some exercise in the morning, like fast walking (if it can be called an exercise :) ), but currently I am thinking of giving some time to my thumb to get healed - the wound is at the bottom or base side, so it feels the pressure of the body while walking. I think after one week, my wound shall be healed and after that I will move back to my work city, where I will try to leave the flat early in morning, so that I can walk up to the place from where I catch my office bus to office. Moreover, I think I will try to use staircase more in office rather than using lifts.

    As of now, my family has banned sugar for me from the day the sugar test result came as I told above. So I am having black tea (i.e. tea without milk) and tea with milk both without sugar. No rice, no potato, even though chappatis of white flour of wheat continues daily in breakfast and dinner and even in lunch. No sweet, no cake at Christmas :( , no chocolates. I was thinking of buying the diabetes check machine glycometer i think it is called, but the doctor said if you control sugar for coming 2 to 3 months, your sugar level can be controlled, so currently I have dropped the idea of buying the diabetes check machine.

    But I am planning to add some daily walking or running in my routine - because exercise is the area in which I totally lag through out my life till now. The bones of my legs at the knees have started sometimes hurting slightly (which i think usually happens to people at their old age) and I fear that I may not get osteoporosis or calcium deficiency leading to weak bones. I already told that I am a skinny or bonny person, without much fat on my body currently, except may be a little tummy. I am thinking to add more dairy products in my diet to maintain the calcium level. So any advice for this weakening bones thing? Please suggest. Thanks in advance.

  • WanMinWanMin Veteran
    edited December 2014

    @misecmisc1 not a specialist, but just a thought, if your knees and bones are hurting I would go lightly on the running, besides if you are sedentary as you say you may not know how to run properly which can put even more stress on your joints. You can try a and walk more, but maybe by increasing your daily walking rather than go on a walking marathon, maybe practice some taiji or yoga which will strengthen your legs and joints in a natural way.

    misecmisc1
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    @misecmisc1‌, simply because you are not able to walk, does not mean you cannot exercise.
    There are all manner of circulatory and beneficial exercises you can do while either sat, or lying down.
    Many Yoga positions do not require you to stand, and upper body energetic movements will also get the heart going.
    A cut toe is a poor excuse for doing nothing.
    (Just saying....)

    Google 'sitting exercises', 'seated yoga'....)

    misecmisc1
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    When my knee started hurting, someone told me about glucosamine / chondroitin / msm capsules, and they helped the pain in about 5-6 days.

    Here's a link to the product on Amazon so you can see what it is and the reviews:

    http://www.amazon.com/Doctors-Best-Glucosamine-Chondroitin-240-Count/dp/B000I4DFAK

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    a 150 2 hour blood test in a person under 50 years would be slightly elevated. Normal is 140 or less in someone in that age group. Fasting is slightly high as well, only very slightly. An 8 hour fasting blood sugar in someone under 50 pounds be less than 100. Because our son has diabetes (type 1) I sometimes check mine as well. My fasting blood sugar is about 84 and my 2 hour (which varies a bit on exactly what I eat) is around 115. Just for comparison. The OPs is a bit high. But easily within range with targeted eating and exercise to repair the sensitivity.

    There are all sorts of chair exercises you can do until your injury has healed. Look online, there is chair yoga, chair cardio, all sorts of things you can do seated to get your heart rate elevated, which causes your body to use up excess sugar in the blood.

    WanMinmisecmisc1
  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited December 2014

    Who said you had weakening bones? Get a bone density test when you have the opportunity. I don't know how it is for men, but it's recommended for women to start taking calcium supplements (or eating more dairy) starting in the 40's, due to hormonal changes. Check with your doctor about that. (You just saw the doctor. You didn't ask him that? I always make notes prior to going to the doctor, so I don't forget to ask about my concerns.) Taking more dairy is a good idea.

    There are lots of exercises you can do in place of walking, as others have said. In addition to what's been suggested here, there are isometric exercises. Even just doing push-ups on the floor, and sit-ups helps. This isn't something you need to postpone until your injury heals. You only need to avoid irritating the area of the injury.

    Here's a thought about your bone density question. Calcium leaches out of the system while we're sleeping, lying prone. So you might take a calcium supplement before going to bed, or have a bed-time snack of cheese or plain yogurt.

    misecmisc1
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    Above, I hope it was clear I meant to say "in someone under 50 years" and not "in someone under 50 pounds" LOL. Oops.

    Dakini
  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran
    edited March 2015

    Hi All,

    After more than 2 months, today i again went for my sugar test - both at fasting and after 2 hours of meal.

    At fasting, it came out 100 with the range 70-110, so a decrease of 2 from 2 month's back test result, after which i started this thread.

    After 2 hours of meal (though it was not exactly 2 hours, but something like 1hour 45 minutes), it came out 159, with the range 90-160.

    For the last 2 months, i have stopped eating potato and rice. No sugar in tea.

    Though i do eat biscuits (not cream biscuits :) ), but those biscuits do have a little bit of sugar in them.

    No chocolate or desert :(

    No exercise, till now I have not been able to put exercise in my daily routine, may be I am too lazy.

    Any suggestions if somebody has, please tell. Thanks in advance.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    These are questions you should be asking your doctor, not us.

  • DavidDavid some guy The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran
    I was gonna say... Wtf?

    Have you asked your hairstylist?
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    When I was a child barbers used to ask their male customers "Something for the weekend?" When I later found out what that meant it really made me chuckle.

  • seeker242seeker242 Zen Florida, USA Veteran

    @misecmisc1 said:
    Any suggestions if somebody has, please tell. Thanks in advance.

    Very good book on the subject.

    http://pcrm.org/shop/byNealBarnard/dr-barnards-program-for-reversing-diabetes

  • anatamananataman Who needs a title? Where am I? Veteran

    @federica said:
    These are questions you should be asking your doctor, not us.

    I agree @federica the family doctor or surgeon treating the wound will have the full picture and no doubt have performed a full examination along with other illuminating blood tests. Snippets of information bear no relation to a proper consultation with a fully trained physician. Most general practitioners should be able to deal with diagnosing and treating or referring to a specialist if it's beyond their ability to deal with.

    As long as you haven't got a wound discharging pus and a swelling red leg indicating cellulitis, I wouldn't be too concerned! Just go for the follow up appointments, or seek emergency help if you think you are getting cellulitis. Type 2 diabetes requires discipline in self-control...

    Good luck

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    Sugar is not the only culprit. Refined sugar, like that you put in tea and in candy, bakery goods and so on certainly have a big impact on blood glucose. But carbohydrates of any type affect it as well, even the healthiest fruits, whole grains and so on. The effect can be less, or it can be different, but there is still an affect. Our son is diabetic like I said before, and fruit or biscuits raise his blood sugar the same as candy or rice.
    Grains, cereals, biscuits, breads, almost all fruits, potatoes of all types, pasta, honey...all those things (and more) have plentiful carbs that will affect your blood sugar.

    Some foods are absorbed faster so have a more immediate effect, and a worse effect, causing a blood sugar spike and then a drop. If you look online for the Glycemic Index, it will tell you which foods are higher and they should be very limited or eliminated completely from your diet. Stick to lower glycemic foods. And regardless of what you eat, your portion size needs to be on track.

    You really should ask your doctor how many carbs you should be eating in a day, and then use any number of diet trackers (I use myfitnesspal.com) to see how many carbs you are eating during the day, and at each meal and snack. There is no way to know without tracking. Dropping added sugar and white rice and potatoes is a start, but there is a lot more to diabetes and pre-diabetes than that.

    As for exercise, just start walking. You don't need to put a complex fitness plan in place. Just getting your body moving uses blood sugar. If you go for even a short walk after you eat (whenever possible) it'll have an impact. A 10 minute brisk (walk faster, not slow) walk is much better than nothing.

    misecmisc1
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