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Equanimity and Let go

is there any difference between the above two?

if so

what is it?

what are they?

Comments

  • namarupanamarupa Veteran
    edited July 2014

    There is a slight difference in meaning, but they are of the same.

    Let go is something you do.

    Equanimity is something you have.

    Equanimity is the ability to let go.

    lobstermmoDandelion
  • upekkaupekka Veteran
    edited July 2014

    @namarupa said:
    There is a slight difference in meaning, but they are of the same.

    Let go is something you do.

    Equanimity is something you have.

    Equanimity is the ability to let go.

    one has to let go of greed and hate to bring equanimity

    then

    equanimity is something one could have

    therefore

    one has to 'let go of equanimity' too to get liberated?

    is that so?

    lobster
  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    "Nothing should be clung to", I believe was what the Buddha said.
    Like anything else of benefit, implement, freely, with right Intention, then 'Let go' when necessary.

    lobsterShoshin
  • HamsakaHamsaka goosewhisperer Polishing the 'just so' Veteran

    Maybe that equanimity is a prerequisite for letting go?

  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited July 2014

    @federica said:
    'Let go' when necessary.

    Exactly so. No premature 'killing of the Buddha on the road' until equanimity is part of ones being. What is still and what is still outraging our sense of 'proper dharma'?

    This morning whilst subduing my cushion by sitting on him, my mind was going all over the place. Do I constrain or allow to settle? Do I look for the equanimity in the breath or consider it an agitation of equanimity?

    Not too tight. Not too loose. Middle Path.
    :wave: .

  • @upekka said:

    is that so?

    Sounds like a plan :thumbsup: .

    lobster
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran
    edited July 2014

    Kia Ora,

    "Transient alas are all component things,
    Subject are they to birth and then decay:
    Having gained birth to death the life flux swings:
    Bliss truly dawns when unrest dies away !"

    Equanimity is a Teflon coated mind 'nothing sticks' hence a non-clinging mind...So in a sense they are one of the same.....

    Metta Shoshin . :) ..

  • CittaCitta Veteran

    Equanimity might be a result of ' letting go'..but equally it is often the result of not picking up.
    The Pali is interesting. The term most often translated as equanimity is upekkha which comes from upa and ikkha which means to look over from a distance.

    To stand back. To view from a neutral perspective, To feel neither attraction nor aversion.

    The worst translation of upekkha is 'indifference'..which led many people to assume that Buddhists should not care about anything..

    DavidDandelion
  • CittaCitta Veteran

    Equanimity might be a result of ' letting go'..but equally it is often the result of not picking up.
    The Pali is interesting. The term most often translated as equanimity is upekkha which comes from upa and ikkha which means to look over from a distance.

    To stand back. To view from a neutral perspective, To feel neither attraction nor aversion.

    The worst translation of upekkha is 'indifference'..which led many people to assume that Buddhists should not care about anything..

    anataman
  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I once saw it translated as 'benign indifference' which I thought not only clumsy, but equally inaccurate.

    Davidanataman
  • VictoriousVictorious Grim Veteran

    @upekka said:
    is there any difference between the above two?

    if so

    what is it?

    what are they?

    I would say that after achieving equanimity there is no more to let go of. The third and last of the below

    But otherwise it all depends, I suppose, by what is meant by equanimity.

    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn36/sn36.031.nypo.html

    "Now, O monks, what is worldly equanimity? There are these five cords of sensual desire: forms cognizable by the eye... tangibles cognizable by the body that are wished for and desired, agreeable and endearing, associated with sense desire and alluring. It is the equanimity that arises with regard to these five cords of sense desire which is called 'worldly equanimity.'

    "Now, what is unworldy equanimity? With the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous disappearance of gladness and sadness, a monk enters upon and abides in the fourth meditative absorption, which has neither pain-nor-pleasure and has purity of mindfulness due to equanimity. This is called 'unworldly equanimity.'

    "And what is the still greater unworldly equanimity? When a taint-free monk looks upon his mind that is freed of greed, freed of hatred and freed of delusion, then there arises equanimity. This is called a 'still greater unworldly equanimity.'

    lobster
  • pegembarapegembara Veteran
    edited July 2014

    Wisdom leads to equanimity but it still needs to be balanced with compassion (letting go of equanimity) @upekka as the zen saying goes-

    "At first, I saw mountains as mountains and rivers as rivers. Then, I saw mountains were not mountains and rivers were not rivers. Finally, I see mountains again as mountains, and rivers again as rivers."

    Wisdom and compassion

    http://www.buddhanet.net/oxherd10.htm

    upekkaJeffrey
  • EugeneEugene Explorer

    When I meditate using the Four Abodes, I actually phrase the last one as "May I dwell in the great letting-go free from passion, anger and prejudice," replacing "equanimity" with "letting-go." But I figure I can do that.

  • upekkaupekka Veteran
    edited July 2014

    Thanks for everyone who contributed to the thread

    @pegembara said:
    Wisdom leads to equanimity but it still needs to be balanced with compassion (letting go of equanimity) upekka as the zen saying goes-

    "At first, I saw mountains as mountains and rivers as rivers. Then, I saw mountains were not mountains and rivers were not rivers. Finally, I see mountains again as mountains, and rivers again as rivers."

    Wisdom and compassion

    after contemplating further more it is obvious how true above is

    At first, I saw mountains as mountains and rivers as rivers.
    (this is how we normal people 'see' any thing and every thing with delusion, greed or hate)

    Then, I saw mountains were not mountains and rivers were not rivers
    (this is how people who got the Noble Right View 'see' any thing and every thing with Wisdom, there is no more delusion, greed or hate, there is equanimity)

    Finally, I see mountains again as mountains, and rivers again as rivers.
    (this is how Wise people 'see' any thing and everything with Equanimity and Compassion)

    So there should be balanced in equanimity and compassion

    Thanks @pegembra

    lobsterpegembara
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