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Sensing the body

KeromeKerome Love, love is mysteryThe Continent Veteran

When you lovely people sit down to meditate, do you notice any noise in your sense of the body? Like tingling on the tongue or in the feet, little repetitive pulses below the abdomen, or little jerks on some parts of the torso? What do you do with these sensations, just try to ignore them?

Comments

  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited January 19

    Relax into them.

    @Kerome said:
    When you lovely people ...

    oops not directed at clawed cructaceans ...
    Hope some dharma luvvlies have the answer ... ;)

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Kerome said:
    When you lovely people sit down to meditate, do you notice any noise in your sense of the body? Like tingling on the tongue or in the feet, little repetitive pulses below the abdomen, or little jerks on some parts of the torso?

    Constant pain in my left leg, and incessant tinnitus.

    What do you do with these sensations, just try to ignore them?

    Either that or incorporate them into my Awareness and Observe them in Meditation.

    Keromelobster
  • FoibleFullFoibleFull Canada Veteran

    I have recurring atrial fibrillation ... often, when I sit down (or when I'm NOT sitting down), my heart thumps around in my chest here and there, strong and weak ... it is very distracting, and breathing is difficult. So I use all that as part of my mindfulness practice. Buddhism is about opening to and relaxing into whatever is happening, and our quest for happiness, for having what we want and avoiding what we don't like, is not particularly related to the practice of Buddhism.

    lobsterFosdick
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    When you lovely people sit down to meditate, do you notice any noise in your sense of the body?
    Like tingling on the tongue or in the feet, little repetitive pulses below the abdomen, or little jerks on some parts of the torso?

    Sensations are happening throughout the body all the time...( just focus your awareness to your big toe and feel the sensations occurring there right this very moment, and this will apply to any part of the body) just let them be...the mind's focus ( one could say conscious awareness) is in the habit of fluttering from one tickle of fancy (pun intended) to another..._Thoughts>Body sensation>Imagination....

    "Sabbe dhamma nalam abhinivesaya"

    Nothing whatsoever should be clung to !... Tis what the Buddha did say, and if one does not cling to whatever comes up, it will soon fade away..

    What do you do with these sensations, just try to ignore them?

    Acknowledge then let flow...and go with the flow :)

    lobster
  • KundoKundo Sydney, Australia Veteran
    edited January 19

    All the time. I get pins and needles when I sit, so I changed when in sitting meditation so the monkey mind stays occupied.

    If I lie down, I have to avoid meditating at night or I'll fall asleep
    ???

    lobster
  • AmanakiAmanaki Norway Explorer

    @Kerome said:
    When you lovely people sit down to meditate, do you notice any noise in your sense of the body? Like tingling on the tongue or in the feet, little repetitive pulses below the abdomen, or little jerks on some parts of the torso? What do you do with these sensations, just try to ignore them?

    When sitting in meditation and observing the body and the pain comes, then by recognize pain as pain, then letting it go. soon a new sensation will arise, recognize it or make a mental note, then let it go. Don`t stick to any thought or feeling that arise, the mind will calm down and the very silence will arise. If you go futuher the sensation of sound and the "outside wold" disapear and even deepr body disapear. then thoughts are gone fully. still observing but without any judgment of it. then even deeper.....

    lobsterpegembaraShoshinJeffrey
  • Good advice from lovely @Amanaki B)

    The minor irritations that @Kerome mentions are easily attended to with attention and relaxed away. With more serious distractions, more distractive (if I can put it like that) meditations are helpful. Walking, chanting and prostrations come to mind.

    https://www.the-guided-meditation-site.com/preparing-to-meditate.html

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    edited January 24

    When not distracted by thoughts I often notice body discomfort. Like dry lips or nose in the winter, kind of blocky fullness in the torso, tiredness, funny momentary feelings hard to describe.

    Kundoadamcrossley
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran
    edited January 27

    Sometimes I find my breathing really uncomfortable, or unsatisfying. It can be very shallow and restless. This often leads me to feel I’ve had a “bad” meditation. I haven’t yet found a way of approaching this issue.

    I can also spend a good ten minutes of a given meditation period worrying about my posture. Am I slouching too much? Am I holding too much? Am I setting myself up for arthritis in later life?

    @Jeffrey said:
    kind of blocky fullness in the torso

    Yes, I think I get this too! What is it?!

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @adamcrossley said:
    Sometimes I find my breathing really uncomfortable, or unsatisfying. It can be very shallow and restless. This often leads me to feel I’ve had a “bad” meditation. I haven’t yet found a way of approaching this issue.

    I can also spend a good ten minutes of a given meditation period worrying about my posture. Am I slouching too much? Am I holding too much? Am I setting myself up for arthritis in later life?

    @Jeffrey said:
    kind of blocky fullness in the torso

    Yes, I think I get this too! What is it?!

    Diaphragm strain.
    Comes from worrying too much about your breathing.
    Breathing is normal. It's so easy, I can do it in my sleep.
    Quit focusing on your breathing, find a comfy chair, put your feet up and relax.

  • I can also spend a good ten minutes of a given meditation period worrying about my posture. Am I slouching too much? Am I holding too much? Am I setting myself up for arthritis in later life?

    Learn to sit

    Kundoadamcrossley
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