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Any good books lately?

DavidDavid Just another unique aspect of the same old thangThe Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran

I just thought since we've had trial book clubs and suggested reading threads that didn't really last, I thought I would try a twist of @Lobsters thread on movies.

I mainly started it because I totally fell in love with a children's illustrated book by Josh Bartok and Wisdom Publications called "I See You, Buddha".

I never wanted to push Buddhism on my daughter but this book is absolutely delightful and even brought tears to my eyes.

Has anyone else read it?

Shoshin1

Comments

  • DavidDavid Just another unique aspect of the same old thang The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran
    edited December 2020

    They were all sold out of the hard copy so I got the Kindle edition but that's not as fun and she can't keep it for years. Now I have both but that's ok. Costs as much to ship as the book costs, lol. I could have gotten it cheaper on Amazon but not this time.

    I still haven't gotten my damned glasses but I can buy books. At least I have priorities, lol.

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran
    edited December 2020

    How strange it is that we fall in love with children’s books but not with those meant for adults. It is like our child selves are that spontaneous part of us which likes to fall in love easily, before being tempered by the adult mind...

    My aunt and my uncle suggested a huge tome of a book to me yesterday called All people are named Janus, they said it was very good.

    David
  • DavidDavid Just another unique aspect of the same old thang The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    How strange it is that we fall in love with children’s books but not with those meant for adults. It is like our child selves are that spontaneous part of us which likes to fall in love easily, before being tempered by the adult mind...

    I love books. I like this one especially because it would have been nice to have when I was little. I am actually starting to find that I didn't lose as much of that child as I thought.

    My aunt and my uncle suggested a huge tome of a book to me yesterday called All people are named Janus, they said it was very good.

    That sounds vaguely familiar.

  • コチシカコチシカ Berlin, Germany Veteran
    edited December 2020

    Hi @Kerome !

    The last two books I've bought were the following. Both from Sumeru Books.

    1. Bloom by Ajahn Sona. Beautiful and short book about Anapanasati (mindfulness of breath meditation) and Metta.
    2. Darwin Meets the Buddha by Dr. Paul A. Keddy. Interesting book explaining the view that evolution and Buddhism do not exclude themselves. In fact, it makes an emphasis on how meditation and Buddhism can help us tackle modern problems created by ignorant and irrational use of science.
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    edited December 2020

    Dementia Together
    How to Communicate and Connect

    by Pati Bielak - Smith

    I'm part way through. So far two main things of interest. One is a principal of communication where the needs of both parties are valued. This is in context of short vignettes about clients of the author who was giving care to patients with dementia. As is generally true both the needs of the client and care giver are important. A second part of communication that is vital is to use the imagination to understand the other person. For example one client was staring at the floor and instead of getting annoyed and saying "ok we have so much to do we better get going.. why are you stopping" the caregiver ventured to imagine that there must be a reason the person is pausing and it turned out that the client sensed holes in the floor that they were worried about stepping in. And that part was interesting to me because I experience auditory things that are not really there sometimes. So many patients with dementia also have hidden worlds of experience that other people do not sense. Another client like in Oliver Sachs book, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, had trouble with vision including mistaking the caregiver for inanimate objects like trying to use her hand for a phone. So in summary I was very interested in the communication principles because I could apply the ideas to my own relationships. And I was also interested in the hidden worlds of the clients because I have my own hidden world that not many people know about.

    https://tinyurl.com/y3j9quwy

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