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Advantageous perceptions

JeroenJeroen Do it with a smileNetherlands Veteran

I came across the following list of advantageous perceptions, which I thought it might be useful to talk about:

  • the perception of death (maranasanna)
  • the perception of unattractiveness (asubhasanna)
  • the perception of the disgustingness of food (ahare patikkulasanna)
  • the perception of no joy at all in the whole world (sabbeloke anabhiratasanna)
  • the perception of temporality/impermanence (aniccasanna)
  • the perception of the impermanent in all conditioned phenomena
  • the perception of suffering in the impermanent (anicce dukkha-sanna)
  • the perception of not-self (anatta sanna)
  • the perception of non-self in what is suffering (anatta dukkha sanna)
  • the perception of renunciation (pathanasanna)
  • the perception of passionlessness (viraga sanna)
  • the perception of termination (nirodha sanna)

These are kind of related to right view, although they are not mentioned in the Noble eightfold path they do come from other sutra’s and are said to be beneficial. There are various links to other topics we have talked about in the past, such as Atisha’s nine point meditation on death, the practice of corpse meditation, impermanence and not-self.

Comments

  • personperson Don't believe everything you think the liminal space Veteran

    the perception of suffering in the impermanent (anicce dukkha-sanna)

    Here I sit suffering, longing for more of the impermanent kind of fun I've been engaged with.

    Involving myself back into the table top role playing world over this past year has been fun and engaging. I like many of the people I've met and feel at ease with people with shared interests and cultural perspectives.

    But with all the fun and excitement comes craving. When I don't have it I long for it. Not only that but at some point the enjoyment seems to turn into a type of suffering itself.

    Its great, but it doesn't last, and I'm left holding the bag.

    Jeroen
  • JeroenJeroen Do it with a smile Netherlands Veteran
    edited September 12

    It’s coming to terms with impermanence and waiting. One develops patience and a spirit of let-go, so that on any given moment things that are loosely held can be released. The problem is really craving. When your innocent head comes across something it really likes, and attaches itself strongly with craving, then it is no longer easy to let go.

    That’s when it is good to meditate on the impermanence of things, and how it’s truly impossible to own anything or expect anything from other people. I always find myself naturally letting go of the things I am holding tightly when I do that, and with it comes an attitude that everything we are given in this life, all the pleasure and enjoyment, is existence’s gift to us, it is not beholden to supply these things to us and it is wise to hold them lightly for as long as we have them to enjoy. What comes next is gratitude and a sense of communion with the universe.

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