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Staying Safe Cronavirus Poem

ShoshinShoshin No one in particularNowhere Special Veteran
edited April 8 in General Banter

Well so far @federica's poem entry regarding social distancing is a umm 🙄 in your face (pun intended) but very effective way to get one's point across.. 😁

"Bugger off, this is my space -
Come any closer and I'll cough in your face!!"
😁

Mine was somewhat less confrontational, a bit drab in comparison ......

" Kia Ora (or any greeting) I don't know you and you don't know me
So let's keep our distance and stay cronavirus free"

To get your creative juices flowing...

What funny or not so funny rhyming poem can you come up with......?

Comments

  • SuraShineSuraShine South Australia Explorer
    edited April 8

    It's been 7 hours and 15 days,
    Since you took my pub away.....

    Nothing compares,
    I have no beer do you?

    Shoshinfederica
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    When I first read that @Bunks I thought "Ah how sweet" ... then the penny dropped and I saw the dark side ;) ;)

    Bunks
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    @FeistyGibblets said:

    I have no beer do you?_

    This reminds me of the Aussie song "Pub with no beer"

    Bunks
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @Shoshin said:
    When I first read that @Bunks I thought "Ah how sweet" ... then the penny dropped and I saw the dark side ;) ;)

    Haha! I hope you didn't think it was on reference to this thread @Shoshin - it's just that I received lots of those videos recently of people changing the lyrics to songs. You know what I mean

  • WalkerWalker Veteran Veteran

    Roses are red
    Violets are blue
    You get too close?
    Achoo!

    ShoshinlobsterSuraShine
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    @Bunks said:

    @Shoshin said:
    When I first read that @Bunks I thought "Ah how sweet" ... then the penny dropped and I saw the dark side ;) ;)

    Haha! I hope you didn't think it was on reference to this thread @Shoshin - it's just that I received lots of those videos recently of people changing the lyrics to songs. You know what I mean

    No I didn't @Bunks .... :)

  • SuraShineSuraShine South Australia Explorer

    @Bunks said:
    I swear, if one more person sends me a song with changed lyrics for corona virus I'll hug them!! :)

    Be thankful you don't live in my house. My husband does it ALL. THE. TIME.

  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    Wot no words ... iz zen poem!?

    WalkerShoshin
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    @FeistyGibblets said:
    It's been 7 hours and 15 days,
    Since you took my pub away.....

    Nothing compares,
    I have no beer do you?

    Perhaps this should be a ‘croonavirus’ poem...

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    @Walker said:
    Roses are red
    Violets are blue
    You get too close?
    Achoo!

    It reminds me of this old nursery rhyme

    "Ring-a-ring o' roses,
    A pocket full of posies,
    A-tishoo! A-tishoo!
    We all fall down"

    The invariable sneezing and falling down in modern English versions have given would-be origin finders the opportunity to say that the rhyme dates back to the Great Plague. A rosy rash, they allege, was a symptom of the plague, and posies of herbs were carried as protection and to ward off the smell of the disease. Sneezing or coughing was a final fatal symptom, and "all fall down" was exactly what happened.

    Walker
  • johnathanjohnathan ICBI Canada Veteran
    edited April 11

    @Shoshin
    The only version I ever heard was:

    Ring around the rosey
    Pockets full of posies,
    Ashes, Ashes!
    We all fall down.

    Ring around the rosey = describing the sign one has contracted the plague

    Pockets full of posies = to cover the smell of death after one passed.

    Ashes, Ashes = all those who died of the plague and all their possessions that might also be contaminated is burned.

    We all fall down = we all die (all those who contract the plague)

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    The one I posted was the only version I knew of growing up in the UK...

  • SuraShineSuraShine South Australia Explorer

    @Shoshin said:
    The one I posted was the only version I knew of growing up in the UK...

    We had that version at school here too (South Australia)

  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited April 14

    We learnt not one, but 2 verses...

    A Ring around the roses
    A pocket full of posies
    Atisshoo! Atishoo!
    We all fall down!

    A ring a ring of rosy
    London Town's a forzy*
    To ashes, to ashes
    it all falls down!

    The first verse details the plage.
    The second, the Great Fire of London, in 1666.

    (* Old Local colloquial English for Forge or Furnace )

  • VimalajātiVimalajāti Whitby, Ontario Veteran
    edited April 15

    Anxiety creeps
    for fear of the old dying.
    Abiraunken.

    The earth is solid.
    The water is great and blue.
    Abiraunken.

    A lamp is a guide.
    The wind is freed from the ground.
    Space is freed from air.

    Abiraunken.
    This mind is calm and silent --
    this mind and all minds.

    These solidities,
    fluidities, airy things,
    heat, this emptiness,

    these consciousnesses,
    this great Abiraunken,
    are one relation.

    The dust, a droplet,
    a spark, a breeze, and the sky,
    all rest in this mind --

    the ocean of light --
    the immoveable beacon --
    sweet Vairocana.

    ShoshinlobsterWalker
  • VimalajātiVimalajāti Whitby, Ontario Veteran

    It doesn't rhyme. I didn't read the fine print of the thread. Oh dear. I'll have to do penance.

    Shoshin
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Give me a hundred verse of rhyming poetry ;) ;)

    Walker
  • VimalajātiVimalajāti Whitby, Ontario Veteran

    @Shoshin said:
    Give me a hundred verse of rhyming poetry ;) ;)

    It'll have to be in given in bits.

    I think we ought to open this up to sonnets,
    which to English ears and mouths are sweet,
    unless the rhyming makes you want to vomit.
    (Rhyming often is a divisive feat.)

    I’d love to hear some Buddhist sonneteers
    spin their webs of words, their proliferous verbs,
    their nouns and their adjectival creative cheers,
    while all pretend at sagehood, writing blurbs.

    Sonnets, though, are harder than haikus,
    and some folks barely grasp those rules of form.
    A, B, A, B, C, D, C, D, E,
    F, E, F, G, G – that is the norm.

    A and A, they needn’t rhyme at all,
    and that’s how you join a sonneteer cabal.

    How to explain the matter of how to write
    a sonnet? Tricky, tricky, indeed, it is.
    How to explain the manner in which we might
    approach it? Difficult it is, I say, this biz.

    You have three quatrains – that is all you’ve got.
    Tell your story in three, and then a treat
    in iambic pentameter wrought.
    (The volta is a striking final glee.)

    Don’t be shy, give it an unpolished try.
    A sonnet is a true human bleat.
    Like goats, we make our sounds, our rounds, we sigh,
    we ask our endless litany of “why?”

    Don’t you feel clever, writing a meagre sonnet?
    Bet you didn’t think I’d end with “grommet.”

    In the last sonnet, I broke a sacred rule,
    by all accounts complete I had the gist,
    but schemata for sonnets are a tool
    for the purposes of this long list.

    In light of this, we can from schema stray
    if insight ours can serve us as an ark.
    The rules of rhyme are but a license gave
    that we might strive for brilliance in our dark.

    If we’ve courage and a certain wordy background,
    sonnets are but a mere formal frame.
    If we wish to say something profound,
    we’ve merely to cultivate a certain acclaim.

    A Buddhist sonnet yet I have to see.
    Fame in wordplay isn’t a Buddhist decree.

    ShoshinWalkerfederica
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    I follow all the rules
    like precious jewels

    and when dead
    all is said.

    WalkerShoshinadamcrossleyFrogpond
  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Awesome, @Vimalajāti ...
    Pertinent and to the point, @lobster ...

  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran UK Veteran

    My partner read this poem on Twitter the other day. Apparently Twitter is good for something—who knew?

    ShoshinJeffrey
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    For the many who have lost friends family loved ones to cronavirus and can't attend their funerals...

    Transient alas; are all component things,
    Subject are they to birth and then decay.

    Having gained birth, to death the life flux swings
    Bliss truly dawns when unrest dies away

    A Buddhist stanza said at funerals ...

    adamcrossley
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran UK Veteran
    edited April 17

    @Shoshin said:
    For the many who have lost friends family loved ones to cronavirus and can't attend their funerals...

    Ajahn Brahm spoke about this issue during his Dhamma talk today. He emphasized not measuring a life by its last moments, but measuring it as a whole, remembering the happy times. And he spoke about the privateness of dying, whether we are there to provide company or not. In the end, we can’t follow them. It was an inspired talk; I really recommend it.

    ShoshinWalker
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Thanks @adamcrossley ...I find his Dharma talks insightful and inspiring ...

  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    The Tibetan Book of Living & Dying really hammered that point home to me. It was, when I first read it, an extraordinary piece of literature, and to my mind, still is.
    I never tire of dipping into its pages, because wherever I land, there I am... reading wisdom.

    Shoshin
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