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Simple Buddhism

Jpswan2020Jpswan2020 Edinburgh New

Hi all
Having studied a little of Mahayana Buddhism, I was wondering why are there so many schools of Buddhism and also as I’m not one for complex stuff what is the simple way to learn more about Buddhism ie what’s the most basic and simplistic Buddhism to learn.

Thank you all. 😎

ShoshinAlex

Comments

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    Hi I'm not sure why there are so many schools. Traditionally Tibetan starts with reflecting on suffering is in samsara, life and death is uncertain and don't know when death is coming, the rare precious life, and the power of our actions.

    https://www.lionsroar.com/four-reflections-that-strengthen-your-intention-to-practice/

    Also I might try to find a basic meditation instruction and see what you think.

    lobsterJpswan2020
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited May 21

    @Jpswan2020 said:
    Hi all

    Hi :)

    what’s the most basic and simplistic Buddhism to learn.

    Yours! :)

    You might be suited to walking meditation or prostrations.
    https://cundi.weebly.com/meditation.html

    or ...
    https://speculativenonbuddhism.com/2020/05/20/stranger-sutra/amp

    Thank you all. 😎

    💗🙏🏽🦞

    Jpswan2020
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @lobster said:

    You might be suited to walking meditation or prostrations.
    https://cundi.weebly.com/meditation.html

    Wise words @lobster - walking meditation is an excellent practice

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    I’ve read a fair bit of material from different schools, and I’m not sure it matters what Buddhist school you start off in. The core of the teaching tends to remain the same. And for westerners it’s often the case that you go to whatever form of Buddhism is near you, there is not always a lot of choice and joining a sangha tends to be better than going it alone.

    But if for whatever reason you can’t make it to a Buddhist center then I’d start with reading a general overview like Buddhism for Dummies, which tells you a bit about the different major schools and gives you some of the flavour, so that you can choose something that resonates with you, and then read a few books in that tradition.

    In Buddhism in the west there is almost always a balance between reading and practice, where the practice is a form of meditation. And there are forums like this, which are almost a kind of virtual sangha where you can ask questions.

    lobsterJpswan2020Walkeradamcrossley
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    Does it come in a comic format, like the ox herding pics @Kerome?

    meanwhile ...
    http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma4/mpe.html

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    That’s certainly true, there are quite a few fans of Thich Nhat Hanh’s brand of Buddhism here on the forum, and you are right when you say that it is not too complicated. He puts the emphasis on the practice, mindfulness of breathing, and further teaching generally happens during retreats. If that appeals to you then that is not a bad place to be.

    Jpswan2020BunksadamcrossleyAlex
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    @lobster said:
    Does it come in a comic format, like the ox herding pics @Kerome?

    You say that friend @lobster, but I think there is a Japanese manga in eight volumes...

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    @Rob_V said:
    I think your ultimate school chooses you, often based on your personality and temperament. Yes, many Westerners tend to lean toward what is near them, but ultimately, true seekers look until they find whatever it is they're looking for.

    Absolutely, people keep looking until they find something that fits. Personally I started with Thich Nhat Hanh from books and videos, then I discovered a Tibetan temple near here and I joined them and did some courses there, then I started to look more in depth towards the Buddha and I discovered the Thai Forest tradition and I’ve kind of stayed with them.

    But my spiritual background is somewhat eclectic (I blame my hippy parents) and while I see Buddhism as an important source of wisdom, I do still mix in teachings from various sources, which I consider a healthy part of being an individual.

    In the interim, poke around on YouTube, you never know what you'll run into.

    For a beginning Buddhist, there is a lot of orientation that you can do. If you want to stick with something simple, the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh on YouTube are excellent, there are several whole retreats and many dhamma talks.

    If you want to go broader afield there are podcasts like Buddhist Geeks, and just from reading a bit of the history of this forum you will come across many and varied Buddhist topics.

    BunksJpswan2020
  • Ren_in_blackRen_in_black Georgia Explorer

    @federica said:

    The etymological root of the word Dukkha, also means an axle that is warped or twisted.

    I only recently learned this, and when I did I felt relief. For me this clarified Dukkha better than any of the English translations of the word, and it re-centered my approach to Buddhism.

    Bunkslobsteradamcrossleyhow
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Simple Buddhism
    what’s the most basic and simplistic Buddhism to learn

    As you venture along the path you'll find, Buddhism is very straight forward/simple...
    It's just the clinging self that finds ways to make it more complex/difficult..Ie, makes a mountain out of a molehill so to speak...

    lobsterSuraShine
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    I likes simple ...

  • Rob_VRob_V North Carolina Explorer

    I only recently learned this, and when I did I felt relief. For me this clarified Dukkha better than any of the English translations of the word, and it re-centered my approach to Buddhism.

    I always kind of liked "annoyance"

    BunksRen_in_blacklobster
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    If one thinks about it....
    Dukkha is the thread that runs through all threads...

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    @Kerome said:

    @lobster said:
    Does it come in a comic format, like the ox herding pics @Kerome?

    You say that friend @lobster, but I think there is a Japanese manga in eight volumes...

  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited May 25

    oh books ... and comics <3

    ... meanwhile beginners quick guide ...
    https://tricycle.org/beginners/

    Jpswan2020
  • SuraShineSuraShine South Australia Explorer

    @Rob_V said:

    I only recently learned this, and when I did I felt relief. For me this clarified Dukkha better than any of the English translations of the word, and it re-centered my approach to Buddhism.

    I always kind of liked "annoyance"

    I have always found "Unsatisfactory" quite on point myself.

    Bunkslobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will develop and cultivate the liberation of mind by loving-kindness, make it our vehicle, make it our basis, stabilize it, exercise ourselves in it, and fully perfect it.’ Thus should you train yourselves.

    Buddha

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