Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

The Future of Spirituality

KeromeKerome Certainty is the enemy of wonderThe Continent Veteran

I came across this ad on YouTube for a masterclass on Ken Wilber’s work, showing the influence he has had over the years on the personal development sector. The tagline was “Deep insight into The Future of Spirituality”. It was a nice schpiel, as you sometimes see on there, and I was a little charged up on the rhetoric of a Terence McKenna workshop that I had been listening to.

Of course these kinds of things are all marketing speak. But it made me wonder, what truly is the future of spirituality? In the 1980’s we had Krishnamurti and Osho, in the 1990’s Ken Wilber and Deepak Chopra, in the 2000’s Eckhart Tolle, and then in the 2010’s nobody? Can we expect somebody new to provide some kind of insight?

The whole area of personal development is a bit more pervaded with faux science than real spirituality, but you do sometimes come across interesting authors and personalities. What do you think of it? Is this an area that interests you at all?

Comments

  • コチシカコチシカ Berlin, Germany Veteran

    Right now, my "spiritual" reference in terms of someone from our decade is Ajahn Sona. Even though he is strict follower of the Theravada school, his teachings speak in a way which -I perceive- that are quite appropriate for the Western audiences he is targeting. Of course, he is not as popular as the names you have listed.

    I like how he engages with scientific discoveries, instead of just banishing them, or contributing towards this -I don't know why- dichotomy "spirituality / science". I have to say neuropsychology and cognitive studies are supporting a lot of what Buddhism has to say. It is a pity that sometimes science requires you to torment, behead, and study mice's brain to ensure their conclusions can be generalised and valid.

  • The Future of Spirituality

    It is here. It is personal, personalised and mainstream.

    • Covid spirituality, the hermit generation.
    • Virtual spirituality
    • Yoga and meditation
    • Earth spirituality

    As the West integrates and commercialises, some are going deeper. Which is always the way.

    Are we on a path? Always.

  • JasonJason God Emperor Arrakis Moderator
    edited February 21

    There's a ton of Buddhist monastics I can point to, both young and old, that I think are great. Many are in the Thai Forest tradition (e.g., Amaro, Brahm, Pasanno, Sumedho, Sona, Sudanto, Thanissaro, Viradhammo, etc.). In other traditions, I can point to some as well. Richard Rohr, a Franciscan mystic, is one example. On Being often has a number of people from various traditions that I think illustrate the future of spirituality. And I'd even include people like Russell Brand, who is really bringing back perennialism as well as including healthy dose of the self-help/personal development aspect.

    コチシカKerome
  • KeromeKerome Certainty is the enemy of wonder The Continent Veteran

    @Jason said:
    There's a ton of Buddhist monastics I can point to, both young and old, that I think are great. Many are in the Thai Forest tradition (e.g., Amaro, Brahm, Pasanno, Sumedho, Sona, Sudanto, Thanissaro, Viradhammo, etc.). In other traditions, I can point to some as well. Richard Rohr, a Franciscan mystic, is one example. On Being often has a number of people from various traditions that I think illustrate the future of spirituality. And I'd even include people like Russell Brand, who is really bringing back perennialism as well as including healthy dose of the self-help/personal development aspect.

    Thanks @jason ... I’m not familiar with On Being, is it a magazine or podcast?

    I’m sure that Buddhism will continue to be strongly represented in the future, but I do think that Thich Nhat Hanh’s absence now that he has retired will be keenly felt. His was a unique voice I think because as an exile he was not strongly associated with a national tradition or school, but had a unique style all his own.

    Russel Brand is someone who I haven’t really followed, I will have to pay him a bit more attention. Good tip.

  • JasonJason God Emperor Arrakis Moderator
    edited February 21

    On Being is a radio show devoted to spirituality that's also a podcast. The host has different guests each week from different backgrounds, professions, and religious traditions and each segment focuses on a spiritual aspect of their life and work.

    https://onbeing.org/
    https://onbeing.org/series/podcast/

    Russell Brand is a comedy who has gotten into sobriety and spirituality and often connects his spiritual studies with politics. He can be a little annoying, but he has some pretty interesting discussions on his podcast, Under the Skin.

    https://www.russellbrand.com/podcast/

    Richard Rohr is good, too. He's very ecumenical, and represents the future of Christian contemplativism. He's big into nonduality and has a center devoted to teaching contemplative action in the modern world.

    https://cac.org/

    コチシカ
  • ChoephalChoephal UK Veteran
    edited February 21

    I think it’s hard for any Brit to take Russell Brand seriously. For all I know Jason you might be a Brit who has successfully worked with your reactions to him and come to a resolution, but for most of us born this side of the pond it’s a bit like Charlie Sheen suddenly starting to teach things spiritual. It might take a while for even the well -disposed to take him seriously. Which might say more about me than I am comfortable with..
    Richard Rohr is in my view a very great teacher/seeker who has much to say to anyone from any path. He has reached the motherload, the spring that that feeds all contemplative traditions.

    lobster
  • Shoshin1Shoshin1 Veteran
    edited February 21

    It would seem at times Buddha Nature ( words of wisdom) appears where one least expects them... if the mind is open to what is, without any preconceived ideas.... .Russel Brand case it point...

    When it comes to teachers (in whatever form they may take) tis said "Don't mistake the finger pointing to the moon for the moon or the baby (words of wisdom) could be thrown out with the bath water...... so to speak :)

    I must admit when I first heard Russell Brand I didn't think much of what he had to say, more recently after hearing a recent talk, I've had a change of heart...

  • ChoephalChoephal UK Veteran
    edited February 21

    I realise that it’s a good thing to be brought up sharply to the limits of my preconceptions...it’s like the layers of the onion.
    But ...following a particularly notorious episode I had decided that Brand was a very bad fellow. How dare he then challenge my assumptions.😊

    lobsterShoshin1
  • JasonJason God Emperor Arrakis Moderator
    edited February 22

    That's fine. No one has to like Russell Brand. I think he's not the best person, but he's had a lot of interesting discussions on his podcast that I have found valuable, and see value in his perennialistic approach. There's growth in there, in my opinion, and I pick up what's valuable and leave the rest. YMMV, however.

  • ChoephalChoephal UK Veteran

    Please note my self -directed irony in the last sentence.😉 Despite all prevailing cynicism people can and do change. I know this to be true. I am glad that his words are helping others and rejoice in his merit

  • personperson Don't believe everything you think the liminal space Veteran

    @Kerome said:

    ...and then in the 2010’s nobody?

    My thought was that maybe the last decade could be thought of as a sort of digital Buddhism. With the rise of meditation apps, podcasts, YouTubers, etc.

    KeromeShoshin1
  • KeromeKerome Certainty is the enemy of wonder The Continent Veteran

    @person said:

    @Kerome said:

    ...and then in the 2010’s nobody?

    My thought was that maybe the last decade could be thought of as a sort of digital Buddhism. With the rise of meditation apps, podcasts, YouTubers, etc.

    That’s very true. Apps like Headspace have become very popular, and a number of youtubers have moved into spirituality areas. I’m thinking of folks like Frank Yang, Connor Murphy and Leo Gura. They make some pretty wild claims for themselves, but I have yet to see evidence of any great wisdom. If they are the future of spirituality we are in for a rough ride.

    Choephal
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited February 23

    No one has to like Russell Brand.

    phew! Thank Buddha!

    :p

    I am glad that his words are helping others and rejoice in his merit

    Bravo. I can provide a gag as that would increase his meritorious wording further ...

    Russell Brand is a comedy

    Indeed.

    i must be kind x 10 🙏🏽

    Choephal
Sign In or Register to comment.