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Buddhist quotes

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  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    "To study Buddhism is to study the self. To study the self is to forget the self. To forget the self is to be awakened by all things."

    • Dogen
    BunksadamcrossleyJeffreylobster
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    "Have good trust in yourself ... not in the One that you think you should be, but in the One that you are."

    • Maezumi Roshi
    BunksJeffreylobster
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Learning Zen is a phenomenon of gold and dung. Before you understand it, it's like gold; after you understand it, it's like dung.
    — Zen proverb

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Just as a goldsmith assays gold, by rubbing, cutting, and burning, so should you examine my words. Do not accept them just out of faith in me.
    — Buddha

    adamcrossleyShoshin
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran

    If, after obtaining Buddhahood, anyone in my land
    gets tossed in jail on a vagrancy rap, may I
    not attain highest perfect enlightenment.

    -Gary Snyder, ‘Burning’

    Bunks
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    The only Zen you find at the top of the mountain is the Zen you bring with you.
    — Zen proverb

    Bunks
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Suffering arises from clinging. Therefore for the mind which inclines to letting go, the path to enlightenment is very much easier.
    — paraphrased from the Buddha

  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran

    Anxiety, the illness of our time, comes primarily from our inability to dwell in the present moment.
    —Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of the Buddha’s Teaching

    KeromeShoshinBunks
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    ‘Heroes become Buddhas with one thought, but the lazy people are given the three collections of scriptures to traverse.’
    — zen sutra

  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    Suppose you are on a flight. The aircraft is state-of-the-art, comfortable. Beautiful sky outside the window, attentive stewardesses, soft music, classy passengers....everything is perfect. You are sure that the journey will be quite pleasant.

    But suddenly comes the voice of the captain, “Our plane is off course and has lost contact with the ground. We have no landing point and must keep flying. We have enough fuel to only last ten minutes.”

    How would you feel then? All these wonderful feelings disappear immediately. “Captain please try all means to find a safe landing place.”

    When a person is born the plane of his life takes off. Even if one has another 40 or 50 years to live, the time is like the fuel on the plane: it only decreases and will soon be used up.

    Where is the landing point of our life? Can we enjoy living at ease before we find it?

    Power, status, money, career, marriage, family - are any of these the final landing point of our life?

    Someone who believes these are the aim of life is like a lost plane taking the clouds in the air as a safe landing place.

    Dharma Master Jingzong

    person
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran

    Although from the beginning
    I knew
    the world is impermanent,
    not a moment passes
    when my sleeves are dry.

    —Zen Master Ryokan, Sky Above, Great Wind

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    So, Bahiya, should you train yourself: “in the seen, there will be only the seen; in the heard, only the heard; in the sensed, only the sensed; in that of which I am conscious, only that of which I am conscious.” This is how you should train.

    — Udana

    Bunks
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran

    "Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods."
    (Dhammapada 224)

    lobsterBunks
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    Easy to do are things that are bad and harmful to oneself.
    But exceedingly difficult to do are things that are good and beneficial.

    Dhammapada 12.163

    adamcrossley
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    Amen...🙏🙏🙏

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    "How wondrously supernatural
    And how miraculous this !
    I draw water, and I carry fuel!"

    ~P'ang-yun...Zen poet~

    Bunks
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran
    edited October 25

    The sun shines by day, the moon shines by night.
    The warrior shines in armour, the holy man shines in meditation.
    But the Buddha shines resplendent all day and all night.

    Dhammapada 26.387

    Bunkslobster
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran
    edited October 26

    It does not matter whether you are a layperson or a home leaver. Those who can discern excellence invariably come to trust in this practice. Those who regard worldly affairs as a hindrance to buddha dharma think only that there is no buddha dharma in the secular world; they do not understand that there is no secular world in buddha dharma.

    —Zen Master Dogen
    On the Endeavor of the Way

    lobsterBunksShoshinperson
  • lobsterlobster Veteran Veteran
    edited October 26

    Well said @AsterDogen (similar to Master Dogen but more flowery) <3 💐

  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    "...regard thinking as the carcass of a dead dog around the neck of your beautiful mind."

    Ajahn Brahm - The Art of Disappearing

    lobster
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Bunks said:
    "...regard thinking as the carcass of a dead dog around the neck of your beautiful mind."

    Ajahn Brahm - The Art of Disappearing

    Along similar lines:

    "As a dog returns to his vomit, so a fool repeats his folly"

    Proverbs 26:11

    (Sadly, I know quite a few 'dogs'...)

    Bunks
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran

    @Bunks said:
    "...regard thinking as the carcass of a dead dog around the neck of your beautiful mind."

    This is a bit harsh for me to be honest. Is thinking such a disgusting or useless thing? I tend to favour a kinder approach personally. What do you think of it, @Bunks?

  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    @adamcrossley said:

    @Bunks said:
    "...regard thinking as the carcass of a dead dog around the neck of your beautiful mind."

    This is a bit harsh for me to be honest. Is thinking such a disgusting or useless thing? I tend to favour a kinder approach personally. What do you think of it, @Bunks?

    It’s actually a direct reference to the Vitakkasanthana Sutta (MN 20.4). Worth a read if you have the chance.

    I get your point and I can assure you Ajahn Brahm is one of the most compassionate and kind monks you’ll ever come across. I’ve heard some say he is too kind and compassion (if there is such a thing).

    The quote is probably taken out of context a bit. It is written for people who are trying to achieve jhana while on retreat so stilling all thoughts is obviously the objective.

    Us lay folk who have to work, raise kids and engage with our family and friends obviously have to engage in thoughts fairly constantly.

    But, let’s be honest, I’d go so far as to say 90% of the thoughts we engage in are useless and could easily be chucked away.

    adamcrossleylobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran Veteran

    @ Dogen said:
    ... no secular world in buddha dharma.

    No secular, no ignorance, no samsara. Which is hard to comprehend.

    The things we despise or dislike (in my case the orange president) are part of the awake Buddha Nature. Ay caramba!

    Initially and for most of our journey we must focus and concentrate on the beneficial, the dharma teachings, that which we easily recognise as true, good and generating well being for all ...

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited October 27

    @Bunks said:... But, let’s be honest, I’d go so far as to say 90% of the thoughts we engage in are useless and could easily be chucked away.

    I once read someone who commented something along these lines (it's not a direct quote, but definitely the right gist):

    If we're on the bus, and a passenger talking to themselves 19 to the dozen comes and sits beside us, we recoil and have concerns that the person next to us is unbalanced.

    Yet, if we were to verbalise our thoughts, as we have them, and speak them out loud at random - wouldn't we be regarded in the same light?

    And you're right. @Bunks, 90% of them are unnecessary. That is to say, 10% satisfy our needs in considering matters. All the rest is extraneous dross we attach to the necessary thought-processes...

    lobsterBunks
  • lobsterlobster Veteran Veteran

    But, let’s be honest, I’d go so far as to say 90% of the thoughts we engage in are useless and could easily be chucked away.

    I would go further. Some of them harm us, for example:

    • anger
    • worry
    • fear
    • negative

    ... we are all from personal experience, aware of the harmful dross. If disciplined we can refocus/orientate/gravitate towards skilful states ...

    Bunks
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    When you think about it...what goes on behind the scheme is just crazy.. :)

  • lobsterlobster Veteran Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    Learning Zen is a phenomenon of gold and dung. Before you understand it, it's like gold; after you understand it, it's like dung.
    — Zen proverb

    That is a hard one. It is true. Dung is like gold. How precious. The Silent. 🙊
    On deiba yakisya banta banta kakakaka sowak

  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    @lobster said:

    But, let’s be honest, I’d go so far as to say 90% of the thoughts we engage in are useless and could easily be chucked away.

    I would go further. Some of them harm us, for example:

    • anger
    • worry
    • fear
    • negative

    ... we are all from personal experience, aware of the harmful dross. If disciplined we can refocus/orientate/gravitate towards skilful states ...

    Stinking thinking!!! :)

    lobster
  • techietechie Veteran India Veteran

    @Bunks said:

    @adamcrossley said:

    @Bunks said:
    "...regard thinking as the carcass of a dead dog around the neck of your beautiful mind."

    This is a bit harsh for me to be honest. Is thinking such a disgusting or useless thing? I tend to favour a kinder approach personally. What do you think of it, @Bunks?

    It’s actually a direct reference to the Vitakkasanthana Sutta (MN 20.4). Worth a read if you have the chance.

    I get your point and I can assure you Ajahn Brahm is one of the most compassionate and kind monks you’ll ever come across. I’ve heard some say he is too kind and compassion (if there is such a thing).

    The quote is probably taken out of context a bit. It is written for people who are trying to achieve jhana while on retreat so stilling all thoughts is obviously the objective.

    Us lay folk who have to work, raise kids and engage with our family and friends obviously have to engage in thoughts fairly constantly.

    But, let’s be honest, I’d go so far as to say 90% of the thoughts we engage in are useless and could easily be chucked away.

    Problem is, we know they're useless AFTER they've occurred. Dealing with them beforehand is not easy, which is why mindfulness is important (although it's frustrating at times).

    Bunksadamcrossley
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran
    edited October 28

    @Bunks said:
    But, let’s be honest, I’d go so far as to say 90% of the thoughts we engage in are useless and could easily be chucked away.

    I do agree with this. A couple of years ago I had a therapist who said whenever I feel the need to ruminate about something, give myself two minutes and then put the thing aside. Two minutes, by his calculation, was as long as ruminating could possibly be useful for. After that, it's all just re-runs and pointless worrying.

    It’s actually a direct reference to the Vitakkasanthana Sutta (MN 20.4). Worth a read if you have the chance.

    Thank you for the reference. I've read the passage about "changing the peg" before, but not the later sections. Ajahn Brahm seems to be referring to the part specifically about evil thoughts. In that context I do find his comment more understandable.

    Bunks
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    Your life is like a bus with nobody in the driver’s seat - that’s what the suttas and all the great teachers tell us, and it’s also what I say.
    When you realise there’s no one driving the bus, all you can do is sit down in your seat and stop complaining

    Ajahn Brahm

    lobsterShoshin
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    Learn this from the waters:
    In mountain clefts and chasms,
    Loud gush the streamlets,
    But great rivers flow silently.

    Sutta Nipata 3.725

    Jeffreylobsteradamcrossley
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran Veteran

    Don’t burden others with your expectations. Understanding their limitations can inspire compassion instead of disappointment, ensuring beneficial and workable relationships. Remember that you have only a short time together. Be grateful for each day you share.
    ~ Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche

    Bunkslobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran Veteran

    Great quote @Jeffrey

    Chew your food
    Mummy

    Bunks
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran Veteran

    When you hurt me, you hurt yourself.

    When you love me, you love yourself.
    —Beyoncé

    Bunkslobster
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    The speech and thoughts of ordinary beings are like the chirping of cicadas - loud but meaningless.

    Dharma Master Jingzong

  • lobsterlobster Veteran Veteran

    @Bunks said:
    The speech and thoughts of ordinary beings are like the chirping of cicadas - loud but meaningless.

    Dharma Master Jingzong

    What has Jing zong got against cicadas? Loud, repetitive and territorial norm, much like the insects ...
    Too harsh? Ah well chirp away Masterful one 🤗😌💗 ... just a thought ...

    adamcrossleyBunks
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    If one seeks the Buddha, one should investigate one’s mind, for there is no Buddha outside one’s mind.

    Bodhidharma

    Bunkslobster
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    Life is swept along, next to nothing its span.
    For one swept to old age no shelters exist.
    Perceiving this danger in death,
    one should drop the world’s bait and hook for peace.

    Samyutta Nikaya 1.100

    adamcrossley
  • BunksBunks Veteran Australia Veteran

    The worse of the two is one, who, when abused, retaliates.
    One who does not retaliate, wins a battle hard to win.

    Samyutta Nikaya 1.188

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