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The Art of Letting Go....The Practice of the Dharma

ShoshinShoshin No one in particularNowhere Special Veteran

When it comes to Dharma practice, I'm under the impression letting go is one of the most, if not the most difficult things to do...But on the other hand it is also one of the most, if not the most easiest things to do... Go figure..That's Buddhism for ya ;) ....It would seem that it is the underline cause of all our suffering....and that's Dukkha for ya ;)

In the relative sense ...We know that we should but we don't want to, even though we know that by doing so, we will be better off in the long run..

.

In the ultimate senses (Thus we all have heard) There is no clinger only clinging ... awareness is aware of this, but more often than not the thinking mind is not, and choose to ignore it... turn a blind (third) eye...so to speak...

What would you say is the most difficult thing to deal with when practicing the Dharma ? ( bearing in mind that this so-called (often trouble making) self is made up of the five 'clinging' aggregates... )

VastmindRowan1980

Comments

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    I’ve found it really difficult to let go of notions of security and survival. Wanting enough money to live on, a secure place to keep stuff in, a roof over one’s head. It’s been by far the hardest thing to get used to, considerably harder than death.

    FoibleFullShoshin
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Well @kerome, imagine that you have been told you have a week to live. look at all your possessions. Look at everything you own, and then ask yourself, what will happen to it? And whose task will it be to dispose or contend with everything I own? Where will it all end up? Wiull it be given away, dumped, passed on, kept? By whom?

    You've got a week to deal with it all, starting...
    Now.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    For me, it's simple dedicated Mindfulness.

    lobsterVastmindShoshin
  • personperson Don't believe everything you think the void Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    I’ve found it really difficult to let go of notions of security and survival. Wanting enough money to live on, a secure place to keep stuff in, a roof over one’s head. It’s been by far the hardest thing to get used to, considerably harder than death.

    Same, I feel the pull to do meditation retreats or go to Asia to learn. I could conceivably afford it but I'd have to forego retirement savings or sell my condo.

    Recently I've discovered a Vipassana retreat center (free, or donation, 10 day retreats) only 1 1/2 drive from home, so my intent is to start doing those once a year.

    lobsterVastmindShoshinBunks
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    What would you say is the most difficult thing to deal with when practicing the Dharma?

    Holding on to the rope, when you know it is a snake (wisdom). B)
    Also don't let go of your conventional/consensus reality mind - you need one of those. Hold on to discernment ... and be humble enough to realise you are probably not as discerning as you believe ...

    VastmindShoshinperson
  • FosdickFosdick in its eye are mirrored far off mountains Alaska, USA Veteran
    edited May 19

    The most difficult thing to deal with changes over time, it's always changing, but I would have to say that the unrecognized problem, the error you don't consciously know that your making, is the likely the most difficult and certainly the most obstructive of practice.

    Letting go of the self is quite a challenge, but when you think you have managed it, think again. There may be some particular aspect of the self to which you are still clinging.

    This describes me, I think. I am still clinging to a self-aspect having to do with my art practice, and I only recognized it ... just now, actually.

    Shoshinlobster
  • FoibleFullFoibleFull Canada Veteran
    edited May 19

    The hardest thing, for me, is to let go of the attitude that things should always go the way I want them to. And that when I am not happy with something this means something is wrong and the situation (rather than my own perspective) needs to be fixed.
    Illness and physical pain, especially.

    Shoshinlobster
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran
    edited May 19

    @federica said:
    Well @kerome, imagine that you have been told you have a week to live. look at all your possessions. Look at everything you own, and then ask yourself, what will happen to it? And whose task will it be to dispose or contend with everything I own? Where will it all end up? Wiull it be given away, dumped, passed on, kept? By whom?

    You've got a week to deal with it all, starting...
    Now.

    It’s a good exercise, but this is one of those areas where living it is different from trying to get used to it in the mind. I’m noticing it a little in moving house, the various emotions that come into play, and I think it would be a lot stronger if I was giving it all up permanently.

    But for me, there are all kinds of instinctual issues associated with being home, and being safe and secure. I’m a real Cancer in that respect, I like the feeling of having a secure home to return to.

  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran

    I am finding it hard to let go of my attachment towards my family. I am finding that I am always scared about the fact that what may happen to my daughter and my wife - wanting them to be always safe and healthy, fearing the what if scenarios regarding what may happen whenever they go out of the house for some small activities like shopping etc - I think the underline fear which I have is the desire that my comfortable situation may change, if something happens to my family - yes, in my case, it is again about me that I am unable to let go of my comfortable life.

    personShoshinRowan1980
  • paulysopaulyso usa Veteran

    with attachments,what comes to mind,from a buddha documentary on pbs,this female commentator,said--which spoke to me--be smart with desire in the realative world.

    imo,dharma is about the dynamic play of switch in the art of balance in the relative world.really simple.awareness follows the pendulum string of balance.being aware helps the functioning brain adjust and adapt to changing conditions which is constant.an example game of switch.hot--aware--coat of.cold--aware--coat on.it relates to the phrase,change is inevitable,suffering is optional.(second arrow brain function)awareness is our friend.

  • paulysopaulyso usa Veteran

    awareness presents change.dukkha?change your circumstance.the power to change is the choice we make.awareness ties in what lao-tzu said ,at the center of your being you have the answer;you know who you are and you know what you want.

  • paulysopaulyso usa Veteran

    acceptance and letting go is another switch game.an example,accept love and let go of hate of self.

    Shoshin
  • GuiGui Veteran

    I think the most difficult thing to let go of is knowing and the desire to know.

    Shoshin
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